The End of Intravitreal Injections?

The Retina Blog

Intravitreal injection of drugs is now the standard of care for treatment of many forms of diabetic macular edema and “wet” macular degeneration. The results after injection can be amazing, yet every time I inject a patient, I am acutely aware that there is a small risk of developing endophthalmitis with the injection – 1/1000 per injection. And as is often the case, the organisms causing infection with intravitreal injections often lead to loss of vision. It’s a small risk, but a very real one. I wish there were some way to deliver the drugs without having to inject them into the vitreous.

So, I was excited to read of the study by Patel et al from the Georgia Institute of Technology that was published in the July 2012 issue of Ophthalmology and Visual Science. They describe using a 750 micron needle to inject drugs into the suprachoroidal space (SCS)…

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